Workout Myths

You want to start exercising more regularly but are unsure about strange things your friends have said or you’ve read online? Don’t worry, working out can be super easy and fun, and here are some busted myths to prove it!

Yoga Isn't A Real Workout

Yoga can seem quite relaxed to some people, suggesting it is more stretching than working on your body. However, it is proven to increase strength and flexibility, as well as having many other benefits you may not get from a general workout. It helps tone your body, as well as reduce the risk of high blood pressure, and chronic pain. It is a more mellow workout than others, but stick at it, and you will feel so much better for doing it. Some sessions can be intense on your joints, and push your flexibility, but it isn't as intense on your cardiovascular system as other types of workout can be, meaning your heart rate will stay at a normal, steady pace. If it's not as high intensity as you would like your workouts to be, why not use it to cool down, or to give your body a break once in a while. It is proven to calm you and make your body feel good after all.

You Need To Workout Everyday

Working out every day isn’t bad. Each day you should go on a walk, climb stairs, eat well, do at least some physical activity to get your blood flow moving. However, repeating heavy workouts everyday can be tiring, and harmful to your body without rest. You may feel that the only way to get fit, or even build muscle is to be at the gym, but your body actually only begins to change and improve when you're not working out. Not monitoring your exercise and the intensity, can also not help weight loss as it could mean your targets are all over the place, meaning your body isn't benefiting from what you're doing. Make a workout plan, including rest days, and you should see a difference in your body in just a few weeks. If you are unsure, or want to speak to someone, you can always come and visit one of our gyms to speak to us personally.

The Longer You Workout, The Better

Like the previous point, working out every day and for a long time isn’t bad, but it can be hard on your body and not help you see the results you want to see. It is often best to workout for under 60 minutes and then rest. If you work out for 30 minutes for 5 days a week, you will allow yourself to burn calories, as well as let your body recover. It is proven that short bursts of exercise are more efficient than long sessions as you are able to work harder more quickly, rather than trying to pace yourself. If you are unsure, try a HIIT workout once or twice, to see if short workouts work better for you. You should see an increase in fitness levels after about 20 minutes if you do.

No Pain, No Gain

Apparently, if the workout you are doing is painful, your body is changing and doing better because of it. You do want to challenge your body whilst working out, or you won't change and see the results you want. However, if you’re in pain, surely that isn’t a good thing. Fatigue and mild soreness is normal when exercising, but exercise plans shouldn't be painful, or even unbearable to your body. When working out, listen to your body. If you need to stop for a break, stop. It’s OK. If you’re in pain, stop. You don’t want to cause serious damage to your body. Exercise is meant to improve your quality of life, so know your limitations, and don't push yourself to do something you can't.

There are so many other myths and facts that get muddled together which confuse people, but hopefully this short list helps you understand some of the most frequent statements we hear, and figure out fake news from the facts yourself.

What is the craziest fitness myth you’ve ever heard?

Posted in Stafford, Uttoxeter, Workouts.

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